A look back at the cabin design progress

It’s coming along. I promise.

This is just a timeline for me of how my ideas fleshed out over time. Progress made and lessons learned. I’m still in the middle of designing the basics of my “Kleinhaus” (small house) and this is a bit of a timeline how we came to the current phase. From newest to oldest:

2014

2013

2012

So there you have it. I’m still in the process of putting ideas to paper which will be posted here soon. In the process of creating these posts, I’ve had the opportunity to speak to real architects and discuss ideas on modularization. I.E. I want to be able to make incremental changes as technologies and codes change without affecting the rest of the structure.

Part of that process has been creating a “Utility Wall” which will house the majority of the plumbing and electrical circuits. Since the kitchen and bathroom share this wall, I feel this will be the most sensible approach to this. The wires in the walls for outlets and switches will all congregate in the upper section of this utility wall. The majority of the plumbing will be toward the lower section separated from the electrical panel by at least two stud widths in case there’s a leak.

I’m not the first person to come up with a utility “module” of sorts as I came across these videos recently :



I think that gives a brief glimpse of what’s possible and since my Utility Wall will be larger than this, I’m sure I can work in the electrical hookups with ample room to spare as well as improve safety. Since the utility wall wouldn’t be load-bearing, we can cut as many holes as needed in the studs without compromising structural integrity.

An additional benefit of the modularization would be being able to move the kitchen and bathroom to either side of the utility wall. This will also enable moving the stairs and front door to either side as well, without changing the rest of the structure. Considering that I’m designing this not just for me, but for anyone interested to take and run with, I feel having this kind of flexibility is essential to adoption.

I haven’t worked much on the roof yet as that’s proving to be a trickier affair. Supporting a fair amount of weight while maintaining a simple profile is proving to be a challenge. A single slope roof would be the simplest to design, but building it in a safe manner would be a bit of a challenge. Multiple slopes is easier, counter-intuitively, easier to build in some ways as the methodologies are well established, as are the building techniques. More pondering is in order.

5 thoughts on “A look back at the cabin design progress

  1. We’re pretty fond of the simple sloped, non-peaked roof. More efficient inside, easier to maintain, better interior space. Are you having cisterns and things like that for water collection? Ah, self sufficiency! Hope the sleep project is coming along apace as well.

    • I’m thinking rain barrel for non-potable use, but there may be a well in the future. I’ll need to work out the details when I get the land.

      I’m seriously considering the single slope. The problem is the half-loft idea which will mean one side may be too short to stand up properly.

      Ah, sleep. Or lack thereof is starting to subside a bit. I recall promising an email and thoroughly fell through on my part :( I’m rushing these days to get some work down before summer is over since I’m going away to for a bit (shocking!) Meanwhile, binaural experimentation fell behind a tad and I’m hoping to pickup again soon.

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