Binaural Beats Experimentation

For the last few days, I’ve been running a few tests on myself as part of an effort to cure my chronic insomnia. For the last few months or so, the insomnia has gotten quite bad to the point that I’ve spent a day or two without any sleep at all and spent the day immediately afterward in what seemed like perpetual aggravation. I’m not sure of the efficacy of binaural beats as there are many conflicting sources all over the place so I started off doing some tests on myself to see if they work.

Preparation

I tried testing a couple of headphones first. My trusty JVC HA-RX300 which I’ve had for years and take everywhere and a new set, a Sennheiser HD280 Pro.

I have a tiny head (contrary to what I’ve been told repeatedly) and the HD280 felt a tad too big, but it produced the best range of sound so far. The RX300 seemed to struggle with the lower frequencies and I often had to increase the volume to the point distortions began to appear.

In my search for binaural tracks, I came across a vast swath of very shrill and harsh samples that I felt were the wrong fit for me. Plus some of them gave me a pretty severe headache after a couple of minutes of listening. Some even gave me a nauseous feeling and that’s definitely a sleep killer. I figured I’d write myself (and anyone else listening) a little disclaimer before going about this.

When listening, please ensure the volume starts low as high levels may cause permanent damage to your hearing. Use a pair of good quality headphones (circumaural, noise-cancelling preferred) which can reproduce frequency responses between at least 25Hz – 10,000Hz and that are light and fit comfortably.

Do not engage in intensive exercises immediately following a listening session.

If any dizziness, light-headed sensation or nauseous feeling were to occur, stop listening immediately, take a sip of cool water and lay down.

This track is for informational purposes only and is not meant to treat any illness or physiological or psychological condition.

Now I just needed to create those tracks.

Binaural selection

Rather than creating one track and hoping for the best, I tried creating a selection starting with the lowest frequency I’m comfortable with. According to Wikipedia, the human hearing range starts at 20Hz so I decided to create a base frequency binaural track at 30Hz (to accommodate us mere mortals before catering to the superhuman).

The 30Hz track was OK at first, but that too became uncomfortable at the 5 minute mark. I think maybe the volume was a bit too high for me at the time, but it soon felt like someone was squeezing my head. I then went on to 50Hz, 70Hz, 90Hz and finally 110Hz. The 110Hz turned out to be more comfortable than the rest, but your experience may differ. Considering I haven’t figured out the correct volume yet and the HD280 hasn’t been “broken in” (audiophiles and detractors, please hold your flaming) I’ll need to experiment more.

I wanted to create a pure tonal track of at least 2 hours to start off. I felt 2 hours was the upper limit in duration to preserve my hearing and sanity. Your experience may vary considerably depending on the volume, the headset, the ambiance of your listening room, the amount of fluids you’ve had etc… Try to start slowly if you intend to follow along in these experiments with me.

I intend to try out non traditional approaches to this whole binaural thing and may go with alternating (left to right sweep) white noise to approach the mythical 1/2Hz Goldilocks Zone of “sensory resonance” if that has any benefit at all. Who knows, this kind of experimentation may become a new hobby. I’ll keep adding to this playlist as the experimentation goes on.

Kleinhaus: Cabin progress

Just a heads up that I’m still not dead and the cabin designs are progressing well, albeit a tiny bit slowly, since the last time I posted an actual design update. I’ve since named this whole cabin project “Kleinhaus” (German for “Small house” — I thought it was pretty clever). I moved away from fancy pure-Photoshop footwork to basic drawing and then scanning followed by a Photoshop cleanup. I found this to be a tad easier and I’ve had lots of helpful suggestions from folks since I started this journey. Many thanks to all of you.

2 Sheets done (hopefully)

The following are sheets 3 and 4 of the overall blueprint which detail the foundation. I’m still working on the elevation views and floor plan and the overall shape of the cabin has changed a bit to accommodate some much needed design overhauls. Gone are the weird 21-24-21 joist spacing of the first layout. This time, it’s all 24″ on center joists for simplicity and my own sanity. I did away with starting from estimates and then moving on to measuring and instead started with concrete measurements first. I found that this makes more sense since it’s harder to skew corners or screw up the lengths on paper. That doesn’t mean these are free of errors and you should go ahead and start with these measurements without double-checking!

These are only 1200 x 1623 full size, but the actual image I’m working with is 5620 x 7600 pixels (18.73 x 25.33 inches at 300 pixels/inch) which is a tad too large to post here. I’m going to make the full size blueprints available as a PDF or something as soon as I finish and correct any errors.

As always, these are provided as-is. Always check the measurements first, follow local building codes, there be dragons etc… etc…

Kleinhaus 16x16 Cabin: Sheet 3

Kleinhaus 16×16 Cabin: Sheet 3

Kleinhaus 16x16 Cabin: Sheet 4

Kleinhaus 16×16 Cabin: Sheet 4

Hacker School banning “feigned surprise” is absolutely brilliant

eksith:

“Feigned surprise” should be banned in any organization that purports to bestow knowledge and build confidence as it does the opposite in both.

Originally posted on Coffee Spoons of Code:

[Since you might wonder while reading this piece what my relationship to Hacker School is: I have no relationship with Hacker School. It has been described to me, and I have devoured the blog. If I made a mistake, let me know.]

The biggest insight I’ve had as a programmer is just how often other programmers are portraying false confidence. My natural approach to problem-solving is Socratic, feeling out different ideas and taking small, well-supported steps. Compare and contrast that with making gigantic pronouncements full of bravado. Writing software is inherently an exercise in managing complexity, which is best done with caution.

The best developers I’ve worked with were willing to admit when they didn’t know something. Of course they could learn quickly. If you meet an arrogant developer who pretends to know everything, be careful. To them, their ego is more important than your software. An insecure person who…

View original 244 more words

Virtual Reality and the F word

People hate Facebook for almost the same reasons they hate the DMV. They’ve become a de-facto license provider for content and contacts with friends and this is even before we get to the privacy issues. After all, you can’t drive to see your folks or drive to a political rally by car without a license. The act ( driving ) and the means ( car ) require special access now that enables said privileges and, to my eye, much the same as commenting on a blog post or seeing your family and friends.

The act ( commenting ) and the means ( site ) require special access as well. The major difference, of course, is that the Department of Motor Vehicles is a government institution and Facebook is a convenience institution. Both have dubious records keeping private records private; one due to incompetence and the other due to profit.

Plenty of sites E.G. Quora and Scribd make Facebook the login provider and, in many cases, the only means to interact such as leaving feedback. So many, in fact that virtually everyone I bump into these days look at their FB account with disdain, yet keep it around for fear of losing contact. Much like the DMV, Facebook is a necessary ( arguable ) evil.

Via @jasonforal

Via @jasonforal

So Oculus VR

Oculus VR created the best and, thus far, only product that takes us closer to the goal of fully immersive VR. Previous efforts have been marginal successes at best and vaporware at worst, however OR was one of the first to not only have the viable product, but a usable development framework that is already seeing applications put into practice. When they signed aboard the legendary developer and sexy beast ( anti-lag and anti-me ) John Carmack of Doom, Quake and Wolfenstein 3D and, more recently Armadillo Aerospace fame aboard, we all thought “now we’re actually getting somewhere with VR!”

If you haven’t been off the tech radar for a while or, like me, are a borderline luddite, you’ve probably come across the product or at least the name of this nifty company. Oculus Rift ( OR ) aims to do for Virtual Reality, what the mobile phone did for communication. To strip it from the pages of speculative fiction and bring about a new age of interaction and experience into the world of gaming and… herein lies the problem.

Oculus was bought by Facebook for $2 Billion, with a b, a capital B and illion boy howdy that’s a lot of money, probably. Now we have a company that aims to reimagine the way we experience reality and a company that has rewired the way we experience experiences. They both touch upon the need for voyeurism and vicarious fancy, of the innocent kind I’m sure, that we all possess to some degree. The problem is what will Facebook, a profile vendor much like Google is an ad space vendor, will do to the experience that OR brings.

Is this the kind of power we want to leave in the hands of a private profile vendor?

That’s a stupid question.

It’s a stupid question because the answer to it is irrelevant no matter what the appropriateness is of a Virtual Reality vendor teaming up with a company known for selling experiences. Or rather the profiles of those having those experiences.

Cannot be unseen

You can close your eyes, but you cannot avert them or look away from the experience completely without taking off the set. We’re far away from contact lenses that will directly project an image into your eyes, but not too far from the fact that OR is capable of creating a full immersive experience that’s pretty much the next best thing until the next leap in technological progress.

Facebook is no longer interested in just your vacation in Hawaii. They’re interested in selling Hawaii to you right at home into your eyes. Not only that, it isn’t a far stretch of an imagination to see a future in which you not only share your profiles via text, but profiles as experiences. Why leave home when you can live with your family without actually getting on that car at all? And with that, I have fulfilled my Philip K. Dick quota for the day.

Facebook’s purchase makes perfect sense in that context and it would have been stupid for Oculus VR, which engages in some of the most expensive research in tech space, to turn down the offer.

Whether we like it or not, we’re living in a world that any product or service that can be imagined, will eventually be created and experienced with varying degrees of success. Whether Oculus VR or some other company will take the last mantle of glory is yet to be seen, but suffice it to say, we’re not too far off from the time when people will look back at our text and emoji based status updates and exclaim, “my, how quaint!” or an equivalent in whatever vernacular exists at the time.